When working your engine driving some machinery with a flat belt you may run into slip problems. Firstly check that your tension is ok (see seperate article) then if you still have a problem you might consider one of the following weird and wonderful suggestions from the SEL for belt dressing...

From: George Best This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

I've got a friend that uses Coca-Cola as belt dressing. Some of his engines

have a flat belt that runs the flyball governor. If the belt starts to slip

he just pours some coke on the belt. Works for him. You just need to watch

your coke if you're drinking one and not sit it down within his reach if his

belt starts slipping ;-) He's a beer drinker, but I haven't seen him pour

is beer on a belt yet, just my cokes.

George Best

From: Edward Tabor This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Soap works well as belt dressing. I use liquid Joy on my mower when the belts

slip, they slip slightly worse until the soap gets tacky, then they grab well.

Ed

From: "John Hammink." This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Sometimes at our major shows I 'm grinding six bushels corn cobs

for the spectators, everyone likes it and the children at most when

they may put some cobs into the grinder (safety first ofcourse).

It happens now and than that the belt slips and I found out that

when I throw a small hand grinded feed between the belt and

the engine pulley the belt graps for a few hours more.

John H.

From: farmer This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

A John Deere combine I used to have had a flat belt

drive from the engine to the separator. When it sat there

running in a cloud of soybean dust and pubescent fuzz it

would get really slick very often. I had used about

everything on it over the years. The best was a light brown

rosin stick. The black stick was OK. Plain old asphalt

foundation paint worked very well. I have been known to roll

up a piece of plain (no mineral) roll roofing to use as a

stick. Years ago I used to melt down the tar sealer from

junk battery cases. RTV silicon gasket stuff was only fair

as was shellac. Tung oil was a little better. Permatex high

tack isn't bad.

The "V" belt drive on the grain tank was the other

extreme, it was prone to coast when the tank was empty and

run grain out on the ground. For it I carried a plastic

bottle of baby powder to keep the belt from dragging.

--

farmer

Central Indiana USA

From: Richard Allen This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Sugar and pectin, besides being wonderfully sticky for curing slipping belts,

also are some of the best organic reducing agents around and work great for

fluxing the lead or babbit pot prior to casting bullets or crank bearings.

Make sure to ignite the smoke just like when using wax. Oh, I almost forgot,

they also work great for sweetening and thickening jelly and jam.

From: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

McMaster Carr carries belt dressing, spray or liquid in their catalogue. I

also think our local wholesale hardware still carries it. I need to go by

their for some other things if you want me to check or purchase some. Thanks

for the continued spout search.

Tom Schmutz

From: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (Alan Bowen)

I just bought a can of spray type belt dressing at K-Mart. That would be

a good place to look for us US folks. Is there an OZ-Mart or a UK-Mart,

ect ???

[Editor: We have K-Mark down here too you know...]

From: "Brian and Melissa Campbell" This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This will still get some glares from the ladies in the club when we bring it

up, but we had a belt slipping at our loacal county fair show. The ladies

were demonstrating strawberry jam making in the kitchen so we snitched a

little and it worked great.

FWIW

Brian Campbell

From: BLCKSMTH This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Believe it or not, automatic transmission fluid works for belt

dressing. I was skeptical until I tried it.

Bob Willman

[Editor: Don't use this one on rubber or rubber coated leather belts - the

rubber will go soft and fall about as the AT fluid eats it!]

From: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

I think I remember using beeswax when grinding feed in the cold of winter.

Hugh Atwell