FAQ

How fast is my engine going - RPM
This question perplexes many engine owners and operators. When you are running an engine it is essential that you know how fast it is running to ensure it is operating within safe parameters. All engines (except perhaps rotories) are rated to a maximum number of revolutions per minute (RPM) - beyond that and they may tear themselves apart or become mobile. Both outcomes can cause grave injury to operators and onlookers alike. Another restriction on RPM becomes imposed when the engine is driving a load via a flat belt. Both the load and the belt will have maximum limits.

Aside from the safety issues, it is handy to know your engine RPM when you run your engine under load to gauge how well it is coping. Some people rely on hearing the engine firing on every cycle (the engine is running slow enough for the governing mechanism to allow firing every firing cycle - where as with no load, the engine will only fire often enough to make the revolutions you have set) to determine if their engine is working hard. This is not enough. To avoid straining your engine you should ensure it is operating at the appropriate RPM under load.…

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I received this question from a site member...…

Read more: How much do I have to pay to start out in stationary engines

What are the better magazines of the hobby, and provide the name(s) of anyone who deals in manuals (original or reproduction).

Believe it or not your first source may be the engine manufacturer themselves. Many of them are still in business in one form or another. (eg. Briggs & Stratton, Lister-Petter, etc). It may take some persistence when dealing with them as your query probably represents considerable cost to them. Some are actively helpful and will go out of their way.…

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This article is quoted from a email message to the Stationary Engine List and was contributed by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and is reproduced here with his permission. The article is © Copyright 2002 Tim Claremont All Rights Reserved.

Rookies in this hobby of ours are at a distinct disadvantage until they learn how to read an advertisement. Whether it is for complete engines, parts, hauling vehicles, or what have you. If you do not have a solid understanding of the basic terms, you will eventually get bitten.…

Read more: How to read an old iron advertisment

Cleaning and DegreasingSubj: Re: Good gentle cleaner…

Read more: Initial Cleanup of an Engine