How it works

The 2 Stroke Petrol Engine - Simply Explained

This series shows a cut-away diagrams of a Two-Stroke Petrol engine. This engine design is the simpler mechanically of two and four stroke as it minimises the number of moving parts which must be kept in sync. The description "two stroke" comes from the fact that the engine fires (burns fuel) on every upward stroke (travel of the piston from bottom of the cylinder to the top), thus there are two strokes for every ignition of fuel, and upward and a downward stroke. The first stroke moves from bottom to top, where compressed air and fuel ignite and begin the second stroke where the piston is forced back downwards by the explosive force of the fuel igniting.…

Read more: The 2 Stroke Petrol Engine - Simply Explained

The 4 Stroke Diesel Engine - Simply Explained

This series shows a cut-away diagrams of a Four-Stroke Diesel engine. This engine design is more complex mechanically of two and four stroke as it requires synchronisation of moving parts. The description "four stroke" comes from the fact that the engine fires (burns fuel) on every second upward stroke (travel of the piston from bottom of the cylinder to the top), thus there are four strokes for every ignition of fuel, two upward and two downward. The first stroke moves from top to bottom, where air is drawn in, the first upward stroke compresses the air and fuel is sprayed in, the air and fuel ignite and begin the third stroke where the piston is forced back downwards by the explosive force of the fuel igniting. On the fourth stroke the piston moves upwards again forcing the spent exhaust gasses out of the cylinder.…

Read more: The 4 Stroke Diesel Engine - Simply Explained

Read more: The parts of an engine

The 4 Stroke Petrol Engine - Simply Explained

This series shows a cut-away diagrams of a Four-Stroke Petrol engine. This engine design is more complex mechanically of two and four stroke as it requires synchronisation of moving parts. The description "four stroke" comes from the fact that the engine fires (burns fuel) on every second upward stroke (travel of the piston from bottom of the cylinder to the top), thus there are four strokes for every ignition of fuel, two upward and two downward. The first stroke moves from top to bottom, where air is drawn in, the first upward stroke compresses the air and fuel is sprayed in, the air and fuel ignite and begin the third stroke where the piston is forced back downwards by the explosive force of the fuel igniting. On the fourth stroke the piston moves upwards again forcing the spent exhaust gasses out of the cylinder.…

Read more: The 4 Stroke Petrol Engine - Simply Explained