Internal Combustion

Internal Combustion Engines are basically any device which uses the explosive combustion of fuel to push a piston within a cylinder. Examples of internal combustion fuels include:

  1. Petrol/Gasoline
  2. Diesel
  3. Kerosene
  4. Aviation Gas (AVGAS)

In this section of Steam & Engine you will find both details on the processes and engines, but examples of the usage of those engines.

Internal Combustion Engines are basically any device which uses the explosive combustion of fuel to push a piston within a cylinder. Examples of internal combustion fuels include:

  1. Petrol/Gasoline
  2. Diesel
  3. Kerosene
  4. Aviation Gas (AVGAS)

In this section of Steam & Engine you will find both details on the processes and engines, but examples of the usage of those engines.

Remember to also check the Registrars page (menu item at left) and the Manual Exchange (menu item at left) for more information. If you have an engine it can be to your advantage to register it with a registrar in order to find other people who also have your engine type/style/brand. It can also help out if your engine is ever stolen.

This article details how to adjust a Buzz Coil using this Simple Tester and is part of the Simple Buzz Coil series.

Before beginning it is very important that you note that the output (secondary) side of a Buzz Coil is extremely high voltage and is very dangerous. That voltage is going to be exposed on "open to fingers" terminals in this article. Handle it the way you would handle a live spark plug!

Before testing your coil, clean it. Then hook it up to the tester as shown in the tester article.…

Read more: Adjusting a Buzz Coil

Chuck Balyeat This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. of Texas USA submitted the following cheap alternative to the ubiquitous Buzzcoil. Thanks Chuck.


Here's one sure way to rig up a quick and easy spark coil to run old angine ignitions , keep dogs out of your trash or test the strength of one's continence. The best part is that it is made of ordinary junk car fodder - namely a coil and condensor (preferably one with internal resistor) and a NO/NC Bosch relay found in clusters under late model car hoods .! (If you like, you can add a 0.5 to 1 mfd capacitor in series with a 500 to 1000 ohm resistor across the breaking points of the relay (30 & 87a) and they will last much longer ).

Read more: Bozzcoil - A cheap Buzzcoil alternative

Buzz Coil Tester
This article details how to build a simple Buzz Coil Tester and is part of the Simple Buzz Coil series.

Before beginning it is very important that you note that the output (secondary) side of a Buzz Coil is extremely high voltage and is very dangerous. That voltage is going to be exposed on "open to fingers" terminals in this tester. Handle it the way you would handle a live spark plug!


The items you need to build this tester are:…

Read more: Buzz Coil Tester

Simple Buzz Coil Series
In 1999 at the Tri State Gas Engine Association show at Portland Indiana USA I bought a small Briggs and Stratton which had been converted into a hit-n-miss model by a friend of mine Leroy Clark.


Up until that purchase, I had never had an engine which operated from a buzz coil. I had seen plenty of them but never taken an interest. Well, now I had to. This article series is a summary of all the information I've learned over the last year regarding buzz coils, and will take you step by step through the restoration and testing of a buzz coil. By the way, the buzz coil is the small wooden box nestled between the skids near the battery on the above picture.…

Read more: Simple Buzz Coil Series

The Care, Cleaning, and Feeding of Buzz Coils
In this article of the Simple Buzz Coil series, we're going to clean and restore a coil we found at a swap meet.

Some important numbers for restoring a coil are:…

Read more: The Care, Cleaning, and Feeding of Buzz Coils