How it works

Shell

refers to the main sheets of metal from which the boiler is constructed. Typically rolled steel which is either overlapped and rivetted at the join or in more modern units seam welded to make a cylinder.…

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The Steam Boiler

All steam engines (and other steam applications) have something in common. They all need a steam generating plant which is usually in the form of a steam boiler where water is heated in a large vessel and steam taken from the vessel to the steam engine itself. There are five main kinds of steam generator:…

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Disclaimer: I am not an engineer, this article is constructed from the advice of many people I know.

When a low water condition is noticed (nothing in the gauge glass) the operator should not draw or pull the fire. You cannot safely remove the fire through the little bitty firebox door in a hurry when there is a low water condition.…

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Water Injector

Arguably the most important ingredient in steam operation is water. All steam engines require water to generate steam. This water is heated in a pressure container called a boiler. As the water is heated (usually by some fire source, eg. Coal, wood, gas) it expands and vaporises into steam. Dry steam is 1600 times greater in volume than the water it came from. This is why boilers must be able to hold great pressure within them selves and why even small steam engines are so powerful. This pressure makes it difficult to put new water into the boiler to keep the cycle going. The new water has to be forced into the boiler under greater pressure than the water/steam already there.…

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The Lunkenheimer Injector

The text and images on this page are from the 1908 Lunkenheimer Catalog(ue).…

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